A Response to Dr Kirsty Miller, “Why I no longer wish to be associated with the BPS”

In her public letter to The Psychologist, Kirsty Miller expresses her views on why she has left the British Psychological Society. Now, I am not a psychologist, and not a member of the BPS. I do not know all their ethics and policies, but I am glad that they put out a statement against “racial injustice and [to] recommit to valuing diversity and fighting inequity”. To see that a practicing psychologist (Miller) finds that this is offensive and that she does not “subscribe to similar world-views”, I am deeply disappointed at this notion.

The Spoons Are All Gone

live with a chronic illness and disability. Over the years I have come to discover more about myself and how to communicate my needs with others. Several years ago I discovered the Spoon Theory, But You Don’t Look Sick, by Christine Miserandino. This incredible theory explains how an individual with a Chronic Illness starts with say 10 spoons a day. Each spoon represents a task that uses energy. Whilst someone without an illness may have double the number of spoons, you have to limit what you do that day to prevent you running out of energy.

My Experiences with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder is something very close to me, and I would argue, one of my most challenging aspects of myself – not just for me, but those that live with me. A few years ago I processed my feelings around my diagnosis with OCD, alongside the many misconceptions and stigma’s that came with it. I’ve tweaked it slightly, and you can read it below.