A Reply to Dr Kirsty Miller

I have written a couple of posts in regards to Dr Kirsty Miller, a practicing psychologist, who wrote publicly of her decision to leave the British Psychological Society. She has taken it upon herself to reply to my articles (which I appreciate), and whilst I don’t have much further to add to my original points, I would like to clarify a few points.

SCoPEd: What About the Clients?

When looking into SCoPEd I have been trying to make sense of the reasons that the BACP, BPC and UKCP have decided that they need to design and implement this framework. As counsellors and psychotherapists, we work for our clients and their wellbeing. So why is it that clients appear to be an afterthought to the project?

SCoPEd: Article One

Last year, the BACP, UKCP and BPC released the first iteration of the SCoPEd project – Scope of Practice and Education. I was a little out of the loop, as I wasn’t a member of any of these bodies and was taking a break in my studies. It was all a bit overwhelming when I tried to engage with it, and so I decided to leave it be at the time.

Follow-Up to the British Psychological Society

Two days ago I wrote about the letter that Dr Kirsty Miller posted in the Psychologist, her views and my own interpretations. Last night I noticed that the Psychologist had decided to pull the letter and put out a statement about their decision.

A Response to Dr Kirsty Miller, “Why I no longer wish to be associated with the BPS”

In her public letter to The Psychologist, Kirsty Miller expresses her views on why she has left the British Psychological Society. Now, I am not a psychologist, and not a member of the BPS. I do not know all their ethics and policies, but I am glad that they put out a statement against “racial injustice and [to] recommit to valuing diversity and fighting inequity”. To see that a practicing psychologist (Miller) finds that this is offensive and that she does not “subscribe to similar world-views”, I am deeply disappointed at this notion.

The Spoons Are All Gone

live with a chronic illness and disability. Over the years I have come to discover more about myself and how to communicate my needs with others. Several years ago I discovered the Spoon Theory, But You Don’t Look Sick, by Christine Miserandino. This incredible theory explains how an individual with a Chronic Illness starts with say 10 spoons a day. Each spoon represents a task that uses energy. Whilst someone without an illness may have double the number of spoons, you have to limit what you do that day to prevent you running out of energy.

My Experiences with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder is something very close to me, and I would argue, one of my most challenging aspects of myself – not just for me, but those that live with me. A few years ago I processed my feelings around my diagnosis with OCD, alongside the many misconceptions and stigma’s that came with it. I’ve tweaked it slightly, and you can read it below.